The Scottish Government say they plan to ban snaring and want to consult with interested organisations and the public about such a plan.

The League and partner organisations have been campaigning for a ban on these cruel, indiscriminate and unnecessary snares for many years and we are delighted that the Government is planning to ban them.  It would really help make sure that snares are consigned to history if you could take a moment or two to complete the Government consultation and tell them why you think that snares should be banned in all circumstances.

Animal Charity

Image courtesy of Wild Moors

While you’re doing that, you could also take the opportunity to agree to another Government plan to give the Scottish Society for the Protection of Animals (SSPCA) increased powers to help stop the illegal killing or suffering of wild animals.

Read the Government consultation

The deadline is 3rd October.

Guidance

If you agree with us that snares should be banned in all circumstances and that the SSPCA should get increased powers, we suggest you make the following points when answering the questions.

Simply click the sections to expand.

  • Answer Yes

    Agree that snares should be banned and refer to the following reasons:

    1. Snaring is inhumane, causing severe suffering to animals.

    Many case studies and scientific reports demonstrate that snares are inherently inhumane, causing prolonged suffering and often a slow agonising death to wild and domestic animals. Much of this occurs when the wire can twist and tighten leading to strangulation or other severe injuries.

    Sites where animals have been caught in snares show signs of extreme disturbance to the surrounding ground - known as “doughnuts” - where the animal has tried to run jump or scramble its way out of the trap.

    2. Snares are indiscriminate

    Snares and inherently indiscriminate and regularly catch a wide range of non-target species including Scottish wildcats, mountain hares, badgers, hedgehogs, deer, otters, and family pets. Scientific reports estimate that between 21% and 69% of animals caught in snares were not target species.

    3. Snares are unnecessary and counter-productive.

    Most snares are set on shooting estates to target foxes so that there can be more grouse to shoot for sport. Science shows that if a fox is killed it is usually replaced by another fox within a short space of time.

    4. There are alternatives to cruel and indiscriminate snares.

    These include cage trapping, the use of guard species, such as llamas who can protect lambs from foxes and shooting foxes at night using thermal imaging sights.

  • Answer No

    Disagree that there should be any exception to a ban on the use of snares.

    Because of the reasons given in Question 1 that snares are cruel and indiscriminate – there can be no circumstances where they could be used without endangering both target and non-target animals.

  • Leave unanswered.

  • Answer No

    Because of the reasons given in Question 1 that snares are cruel and indiscriminate – there can be no circumstances where they could be used without endangering both target and non-target animals.

  • Answer Yes

    Agree to the SSPCA getting additional powers.

    Point out that these powers would allow SSPCA inspectors, who are already on location investigating wildlife crime, to search, examine and seize evidence. For example, if inspectors were investigating an animal welfare incident where it appeared that there was evidence of wildlife crime on that land, then they would be able to seize other potential evidence in the area. Previously, they would have needed the assistance of Police Scotland to do this. This should lead to more effective policing of wildlife crime in Scotland and could help decrease the number of wildlife crimes committed, as more cases would be investigated with additional expertise. This would not only deter potential offenders, but also help achieve a higher detection rate and reduce suffering to wild animals.

  • Answer Yes.

    Point out that these powers would allow SSPCA inspectors, who are already on location investigating wildlife crime, to search, examine and seize evidence. For example, if inspectors were investigating an animal welfare incident where it appeared that there was evidence of wildlife crime on that land, then they would be able to seize other potential evidence in the area. Previously, they would have needed the assistance of Police Scotland to do this. This will lead to more effective policing of wildlife crime in Scotland and could help decrease the number of wildlife crimes committed, as more cases would be investigated with additional expertise. This would not only deter potential offenders, but also help achieve a higher detection rate and reduce suffering to wild animals.

  • Agree

    Point out that these conditions appear to be sensible.

  • Complete your own details and consents.

Please fill in the consultation by clicking here
Thanks for taking the time to offer your views – it really does make a big difference for our wildlife and the environment.

Sign up for our newsletter

We'd love to keep in touch. With your permission we'll let you know the very latest news on our fast-moving campaigns, as well as appeals and other actions (such as petitions) so you can continue to help protect animals.

If you would like to know more about your data protection rights, please read our privacy policy.

© 2024 The League Against Cruel Sports. Registered charity in England and Wales (1095234) and Scotland (SC045533).
Registered in England and Wales as a company limited by guarantee, no. 04037610.
Registered office: New Sparling House, Holloway Hill, Godalming, GU7 1QZ, United Kingdom.