In a landmark decision made yesterday (Friday, 29th), Nottinghamshire County Council has banned trail hunting on its land. 

Trail hunting is not a genuine sport but a cover for illegal hunting, designed to deceive the authorities and make the prosecution of illegal hunters very difficult. 

The League Against Cruel Sports has welcomed the council’s bold move and is now calling on other councils across the UK to follow its lead. 

Chris Luffingham, director of campaigns at the League Against Cruel Sports, said: “This is a significant decision both for the county of Nottinghamshire and the country as a whole. We welcome a ban that not only recognises that animals are still being killed by hunts, but that the excuse of ‘trail’ hunting is nothing more than a lie.  

“The League has received 282 reports of illegal hunting in the current hunting season, including 39 reported fox kills. We welcome Nottinghamshire County Council’s trail-blazing decision, and we would encourage other counties across the land to follow suit.” 

Fox hunting was banned in 2004 but animal welfare monitors such as the League’s professional investigators collect evidence that shows the hunts are still routinely and indiscriminately killing British wildlife with their packs of hounds. 

The council’s decision came about as a result of a motion put forward by the Labour Party in Nottinghamshire backed by independents. 

The motion called for the immediate cessation of trail hunting, exempt hunting and exercising of packs of hounds on Nottinghamshire County Council land, which in combination with the Hunting Act (2004) brings an end to all hunting related activities.  

Labour councillor Kevin Greaves said: “Trail hunting is merely a dubious attempt to hide the true intentions of those that wish to continue this vile barbaric act of fox hunting.” 

Councillor Nicki Brooks is also a devoted anti-fur campaigner, was clearly delighted with the outcome.  

Speaking after the meeting she said: “By supporting the motion this council is simply closing the loophole that allows both the ‘accidental’ and deliberate illegal hunting and killing of animals, as well as a ‘false alibi’ regularly used by hunts to avoid prosecution, taking place on council-owned land.  

I’m thrilled that we’ve managed to secure this result here in Nottinghamshire.”