Does anyone doubt the brutality of dog fighting? Forced to fight for their lives, time and time again, these dogs inhabit a truly brutal world. Training regimes slam their heads and bodies, they are forced to run on treadmills and hang on weights. And then there are the fights that deliver appalling injuries. Many die in the ring or shortly after from their injuries. Those too injured to fight again are violently despatched, and those that can are patched up with homemade veterinary kits.

There are no kind words or deeds for the animals trapped in the brutal world of dog fighting.

Despite being banned in 1835 dog fighting remains a significant animal welfare issue in the UK. Whether you live in a city, town or rural area, you’re probably not too far from a dog fight. At the League Against Cruel Sports, we’re investigating suspected dog fighting around the country.

We’re calling for the Government to introduce a maximum custodial sentence of up to five years for the most serious cases. Many of the people involved have connections to other criminality or violent crime and the current mild, slap on the wrist punishments are no deterrent. Countries such as the USA have put much tougher – and more effective - penalties in place. They’ve also worked out that almost all of those involved in the brutal world of dog fighting also have links to other criminal activity, such as illegal drugs, weapons or other forms of violence; so it’s a good place for the police to pick up people wanted in connection with other crimes.

On a daily basis our investigators have to watch horrific film of dog fights to identify where the fight has taken place and who’s involved. You can help us by;

  • Sharing your concerns about people, places and social media accounts involved in organising dog fights.
  • Send us images and films of recent fights that have taken place in the UK.
  • If you suspect an associate or relative is involved, please talk to our confidential Animal Crimewatch reporting line.

Together, we can make a real difference to the animals involved.

It’s time for the Government to increase penalties so that the punishment acts as a real deterrent to stamp out this abuse once and for all.

Let’s hope Michael Gove, Secretary of State for the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs really means it when he says he ‘recognises that the current maximum sentences for animal cruelty are inadequate and need reviewing’. It’s long over due; as it stands you can get a longer sentence for fly tipping than for forcing a dog into the brutal world of dog fighting.


Help us end dog fighting

Sign our petition for stronger penalties for dog fighting

SIGN THE PETITION